Baldwin elementary students present winning essays

ESSAY: Bre'Indel Watkins, essay winner for the fifth and sixth grade, read her speech about what King's dream means to her.
ESSAY: Bre'Indel Watkins, essay winner for the fifth and sixth grade, read her speech about what King's dream means to her.

BALDWIN — Students at Baldwin Elementary had an opportunity to participate in an essay contest about the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., dream, and their own dreams it inspires. The first-place winners read their essays at the Martin Luther King Jr., Commemorative Program, on Sunday.

Hudson Miller, winner for kindergarten, presented her dream.

"We can love each other. We can be nice. We can help," she said.

Aubrey Jones, winner for first and second grade, wrote, "We have a problem in our community. People keep littering."

She continued to express how litter is harmful to animals and she doesn't want them to get sick and die.

"Now I am going to clean up the world with my whole family. Then the whole entire world will be so clean," she said.

"Martin Luther King's dream was to stop racism," said Leila Leonard, winner for third and fourth grade.

She aspired, "Just like Dr. King I also have a dream to put a stop to racism. Racism is still going on in the world."

She said ways people can help stop racism is through awareness, such as displaying posters and involvement in groups and clubs with an aim to address these issues.

Bre'Indel Watkins, winner of the fifth and sixth grade essay, said, "My name is Bre'Indel Watkins. I am a black female, 11 years old and in the 6th grade at Baldwin Elementary. My friends are of many colors. I love each of them and know they love me. I would find it very hard to be separated from the based on color."

She explained, "My friendships are not based on the color of our skin, but on the things we have in common.

"We must remember, it is not about the color of our skin. It is about loving and getting along with each other. "Being separated by color would be an injustice to me."

She told of what she does to keep mindful of her dream of becoming a more loving society.

"In the time we live in we need to learn how to love each other and be decent citizens in society. Each morning on my way to school my mother and I pray a prayer that says, 'Lord, help me to be a smart, productive, loving, decent, intelligent citizen in society." I believe if we could all add this sentence to our daily lives it would help us get along with all people."